Dinithi O'Gorman

Priory Group
Speech and Language Therapist

Dinithi O'Gorman is a (Newly Qualified) Speech and Language Therapist presently working in a neuro-rehabilitation setting which is her first post since qualification in early 2019 from De Montfort University. Dinithi has an interest in social communication stemming from her background in social anthropology, especially around healthcare interactions between patients with communication difficulties and healthcare professionals.

Dinithi hails from Markham, Ontario in Canada and has lived in the United Kingdom in 2012. Prior to pursuing Speech and Language Therapy, Dinithi acquired a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from the University of Toronto (2009) and a Master of Arts in Social Anthropology from the University of Kent (2011).

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Benefits of Speech and Language Therapy in Neuro Rehabilitation

To discuss the benefits of Speech and Language Therapy with persons who have acquired or congenital brain injury. This seminar will also cover types of interventions that healthcare professionals can use to support and maximise the communicative potential of patients.

EVEN MORE SEMINARS

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    Prof Michael Barnes

    The role of cannabis in neurology

  • Dr. Jenny Brooks: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Dr. Jenny Brooks
    The ABI Team

    Neurobehavioural Rehabilitation In The Community

  • Dr Sonia Borghino: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Dr Sonia Borghino
    ENGI Psychology

    Neurofeedback Efficacy withï adult offenders with personality difficulties and high risk of violence

  • Professor Wagih El Masri: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Professor Wagih El Masri
    Keele University

    Spinal Cord Injuries: Factors that influence Neurological recovery

  • Dr Angus Graham: Speaking at the European Neurological Convention

    Dr Angus Graham
    North Bristol NHS Trust

    Neuro Rehabilitation : Triumphs and Tribulations